Irish Setter

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Irish Setter


The Irish Setter is a setter, a breed of gundog and family dog. The term Irish Setter is commonly used to encompass the show-bred dog recognized by the American Kennel Club as well as the field-bred Red Setter recognized by the Field Dog Stud Book. It is clear that, by the early 18th Century, the type of dog known as the ‘Setter’ had come into its own right. It is also clear the Irish had begun actively breeding their own type. The Breed Standard for the modern Irish Setter was first drawn up by the Irish Red Setter Club in Dublin and approved on 29 March 1886.


Irish Setters get along well with children, other dogs, and any household pets. Even though they do well with household pets, small animals may pose a problem for this breed, as they are a hunting breed. Lack of activity will lead to a bored, destructive, or even hyperactive dog. This is not a breed that can be left alone in the backyard for long periods of time, nor should they be. Irish Setters thrive on constant human companionship. Irish Setters respond swiftly to positive training and are highly intelligent. They are also widely used as therapy dogs in schools and hospitals.


Considerable. Irish Setters are an active breed, and require long, daily walks and off-lead running in wide, open spaces. They are a tireless, wide-ranging hunter, and well-suited to fields and wet or dry moorland terrain.


From 61 to 71 cm / From 29 to 34 kg (M) and 25 to 29 kg (F).


The coat is moderately long, silky, and of a red or chestnut color. It requires frequent brushing to maintain its condition and keep it mat-free. The undercoat is abundant in winter weather, and the top coat is fine. Their coats should also feather in places such as the tail, ears, chest, legs, and body.


Red or chestnut color.



(Source: Wikipédia & The Ultimate Dogs, Dog Breeds & Dog Care by Dr Peter Larkin & Mike Stockman, August 2015)

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